Episode 55: How to murder your husband, she wrote

In 2011, romance novelist Nancy Crampton Brophy wrote a blog post on “How to murder your husband.” It turned out to be an unfortunate topic: her husband, Dan Brophy, was murdered in June, shot dead at the Oregon Culinary Institute, were he worked. And in September, Nancy was arrested and charged with his murder.

Episode 54: Albert Flick, never too old to be a killer

Albert Flick was convicted of killing his wife in 1979. After he got out of prison, he continued to assault women, a knife his weapon of choice. After his third conviction, Flick got a relatively short prison sentence — the judge said Flick would “age out” of attacking women. Unfortunately for Kim Dobbie, he didn’t.

Episode 53: The Hart family, not what they seemed

When two apparently loving moms and their six kids plunged off a California cliff to their deaths, the pattern of abuse and control that lead up to it made many wonder how the red flags weren’t seen earlier.

A discussion with our special guest host, our sister Liz the college professor.

Episode 52: It’s Drega, and he’s got a gun

Carl Drega didn’t just have a beef with his northern New Hampshire town, he had a lot of beefs. He also had an AR-15 assault rifle and one August day in 1997 he decided to settle things once and for all.

 

Episode 51: Gary Gilmore, Let’s do it

We’re back! Talking about the killer who brought the death penalty back into fashion in 1976, and inspired a slogan for a giant shoe company. What made Gary Gilmore so special? Listen and find out.

Total other end of the spectrum, we apply our NNW rating to the documentary “Bobby Kennedy for President.”

Episode 50: Think you can’t get scammed? So did I

For our very special 50th episode we get a little personal — one of is $1,300 poorer after she got scammed. We talk about what happened, how it happened and, geez, am I really THAT stupid? Uh huh.

In our special NNW ratings we discuss the 1974 made for TV movie “Bad Ronald” and Michelle McNamara’s “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark.”

Episode 49: A true crime pulp murder

Our long national nightmare is over! That’s right, we finally have another episode up. When a model, her  mother and their British gentleman boarder are murdered the night before Easter in 1930’s New York, it’ s not what you think.

Episode 48: No justice for anyone in the Haysom murders

Love? Manipulation? Insanity? Whatever. One word that doesn’t apply in the thirty-three years since Derek and Nancy Haysom were murdered is justice. We discuss.

And our NNW rating system takes on “A Wrinkle in Time” and “Wormwood.”

 

Episode 47: Did Linda Dolloff go batty for love?

Jeff Dolloff wanted to find a woman to marry who loved his family’s land in Standish, Maine, as much as he did. And he found her. But did Linda Dolloff love it too much to give up without a fight? We discuss.

And in our NNW rating discussion of the documentary “Killing for Love,” can Maureen convince Rebecca about “the absolute biggest problem with this film?” Hmmm. Listen and find out.

Episode 46: What happened to the Turpin family?

David and Louise Turpin are charged with multiple counts for allegedly abusing their 13 children over the past 30 years. What happened between the time the two became a couple — she 15, he 22 — and the moment 30 years later, when their 17-year-old daughter escaped their “house of horrors” in California in January, alerting police, who found children n chains? We take a look.

Episode 45: Brenda Spencer, the shooter who ‘didn’t like Mondays’

The silicon chip inside her head had definitely switched to overload, but how she really felt about Mondays is still up for debate. We discuss the 1979 crime that spurred a song and a lengthy prison sentence.

Also, in a very special recommendations segment, we unveil our Negative Nellies Watching rating system. Now you can understand.

Episode 44: Killer nurse Charlie Cullen, 16 years, nine hospitals, hundreds of deaths

From 1987 to 2003 nurse Charlie Cullen worked at nine hospitals in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He wasn’t particularly smart or sneaky, he wasn’t a master criminal. But he killed and killed and killed. And every time a hospital became suspicious and let him go, he’d go down the road to another one, get a  job and kill some more.

Estimates are he may have killed as many as 400 people before he was finally stopped.

Join us in our discussion of the man who may be the most  prolific serial killer in the U.S.

Episode 43: Who left Ashley Ouellette in the middle of the road?

On February 10, 1999, at about 4 a.m., the body of Ashley Ouellette, 15, was found on the center line of the Pine Point Road in Scarborough, Maine. She’d been neatly placed there after being murdered.

Some 19 years later, police are still looking for her killer.

Join us for Episode 43.

Episode 42: The Gardner Heist, solved or not so much?

In the early morning hours of March 18, 1990, two thieves dressed as police officers talked their way into Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, tied up the two guards on duty and walked off with art that’s now valued at $500 million. Nearly 28 years after what is considered the biggest art heist in history, the paintings are still gone and their empty frames haunt the museum.

Over those 28 years, a parade of criminals and criminal-wannabes have fallen all over themselves to confuse the investigation. The FBI said it 2013 the crime is solved, but no one has been arrested, no one knows where the paintings are and the $10 million reward for their return still stands.

Join us as we review the Gardner heist, the players, the theories and the empty frames.

Episode 41: Murder at Not So Pleasant Point

On a November Sunday in 1965, the extended Francis family’s home was invaded by five hunters from Massachusetts. By the end of the day, one member of the family would be dead.

Join us for a story that still resonates in Maine more than 50 years later.

A Very Special Christmas Episode: Crime & Stuff goes Groovy

What’s the true meaning of Christmas? No, really, what is it? In this very special Christmas episode, in partnership with our sister podcast, Groovy Tube, we find out through That Girl, Mary Tyler Moore, Adam 12 and Starsky & Hutch.

Sure, Santa gets arrested. But it’s warmer than eggnog by the fire.

Episode 40: Killed in their own backyards

One of them went outside to shoo hunters away from her property as her year-old twins played in the house; another was removing a log that blocked his family’s camp road, anxious for a weekend away with his fiancee; another was hunting for gems on her country property; another was splitting wood, careful to wear hunter orange; another, 18, was hanging around outside with her brother.

All of them were part of a small but tragic toll in Maine — shot to death on their own or a neighbor’s property by hunters who said they mistook them for deer.

Join us for Episode 40.

Episode 39: The Maine Crime Writers at Crime Bake

Something different this episode! We interviewed four Maine Crime Writers at the annual New England Crime Bake mystery writers conference.

Writers Dick Cass, Brenda Buchanan, Barbara Ross and Bruce Robert Coffin — all who write different subgenres of crime and mystery fiction — talk about their books, writing, crime and Maine.

Episode 38: Nichole Cable, teen angst, Facebook and murder

Nichole Cable, 15, told her mother she was going down to the end of their street in a small Maine town to “get some smokes” from an acquaintance. It was the last conversation they’d have.

Cable was murdered, her body found weeks later. But not by a stranger, but by a young man who lured her with a fake Facebook profile.

What happened? Listen and find out.

Episode 37: Kim Wall’s fatal final story

Swedish journalist Kim Wall was doing what she did best when she climbed aboard Denmark inventor Peter Madsen’s homemade submarine August 10: chasing a great story.

But Wall never got off the sub alive, her dismembered remains later found in the strait between Sweden and Denmark, and Madsen charged in her death.

 

Episode 36: Murder on the Appalachian Trail

More than 2,100 miles, 14 states and, since 1974, 11 murders. The Appalachian Trail is a pretty safe place to be, unless you run into the wrong crazed killer. All of the 11 people who were killed on the trail that stretches from Georgia to Maine were killed by a stranger. At least those whose murders were solved.

Join us as we discuss those hikes into hell.

Episode 35: Carol Jenkins, the murder a town wanted to forget

Carol Jenkins was 21 and on the first day on the job selling encyclopedias when she made the mistake of agreeing to go to Martinsville, Indiana. She didn’t make it out of town alive.

That was 1968, and her racially motivated murder is still considered partially unsolved in a town that seems more concerned about defending itself against charges of racism that finding justice for a young woman who was brutally killed in cold blood on the sidewalk of a main street.

Join us for Episode 35, which also includes a rollicking discussion of the movie “It.”

Episode 34: Son of Sam, the terror of New York City

In the summer of 1977, New York City was terrorized by a killer who shot his victims at close range, eventually killing six people and wounding seven. He was eventually called the Son of Sam.

While not history’s most prolific killer — or even 1977’s — his brazen attacks, which police determined began in July 1976, made national deadlines.

David Berkowitz’s arrest in August 1977 in many ways raised more questions than they answered.

Join us for Episode 34, where we discuss Son of Sam, 1977 TV and even have a pop-up recipe.

Episode 33: Was Conrad Roy texted to death?

The relationship between Massachusetts teens Conrad Roy and Michelle Carter was one that only could have happened in the 21st century. They lived less than an hour from each other, but rarely met in person. But they communicated nonstop by social media, and in the weeks leading up to Roy’s July 12, 2014, suicide, they exchanged more than 1,000 texts.

Carter’s conviction was the first in Massachusetts history in which someone was convicted of manslaughter for words alone.

Join us as we discuss the tragedy that was the relationship between Conrad Roy and Michelle Carter.